Wednesday, October 5, 2022

Day Six - Jam, Parsley and WWII Vegetable Curry

 


Day six was a good day food wise.

 I started the day feeling not all that hungry, so a slice of my brick of a loaf toasted, with one half buttered and one half jammed was enough, along with a lovely cup of coffee.

Oh, and I'm really enjoying using my cups and saucers.  

The cups are designed just right if you know what I mean.  Your fingers fit through the handle perfectly, there is a little rest built into the handle, so the cup doesn't slip down if you are concentrating ... and to be honest I'm rarely concentrating on my drink when I'm drinking it, there's always something else on the go to distract me.

Lunch was equally as simple.  

As I have a good amount of cheese left, I decided on a very cheesy baked potato and at last I remembered a sprinkle of my Parsley.  

Eating parsley, which grows well in this country for a long season and dries for Winter use, was highly recommended during the war years for its high vitamin C, A and iron content, and my poor plant has been sat waving at me for days. 🌿


I set to and made my evening meal nice and early so that the flavours could develop as it cooled. I chose the Mixed Vegetable Curry from page 39 of my Food Facts for the Kitchen Front book.


It made a nice sort of spicy curry, nothing like modern flavours, but in a way all the nicer for that.  With plain boiled rice it made a pleasant change from all the potatoes and bread that I've been eating up to now.  And there are leftovers of both for tomorrow, so I have adapted my menu for the final day of this week.



I'm currently watching this via YouTube.  Although the quality of the old television series isn't to our current HD standards you soon forget that and sink into the lovely gentle atmosphere of Harry Dodson and Ruth Mott teaching us in their unique way.  Enjoy. 

Sue xx



23 comments:

  1. Seeing your lovely green china brings back many memories, they were a staple of Village Halls up and down the country for many years :-)

    Do you think you might continue to use them, after this challenge? They are wonderful "built-in portion control"?

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    1. I can understand now why they were used in village halls etc ... I remember them from back in the day in many of the halls I helped out in ... as they are remarkably tough considering how delicate they feel and seem. I have clunked my Jasmine cup against the side of the sink quite a few times and each time carefully examined it thinking I must have cracked it. But I haven't and she is living to fight another day.
      You know, thinking about it, I really might continue to use them.

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  2. I like your crockery plate cup and saucer

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    1. Just wait until you see my 'new to me' Sunday Best trio. :-)

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  3. Sorry above comment was from me

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    1. Thanks Jeanette, I appreciate you letting me know. xx

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  4. I loved watching Ruth & Harry. I must dig out the BBC book which I'm sure I kept when we moved. Now I'm a gardener I'll appreciate his wisdom even more

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    1. It's been great watching them again. I have the book from the series too, I must have a read and see what Harry thinks I should plant for winter.

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  5. I'd forgotten those old Wartime Kitchen programmes. I'm going to look them up, thanks. xx

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    1. If you click on the link, you will see all the episodes that follow on from this first one by going to the same channel.

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  6. Love the woods ware too, I have a few of the three colours. My bargain piece was a yellow jasmine teapot bought at a car boot sale for £1. I started my little collection through sheer nostalgia years ago, remembering it being used in all the local cafes etc when I was little. Our village hall still use the green Beryl. It came in handy yesterday as I made ww2 duke pudding for the first time. The recipe needed both breakfast cup and teacup measurement and I was lucky enough to have both. Duke pudding was amazing, can very highly recommend it for making something delicious out of virtually nothing.

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    1. I recently sold my Jasmine coffee pot for £52 on Ebay they are very collectible at the moment, and I wasn't using it ... or the Beryl teapot that I sold for £12. I used to have some of the blue Iris, but I must have sold that a few years ago.

      Duke Pudding sounds intriguing I am going to look it up, thanks ... and I have both sized cups, so I am all ready. I must say I prefer drinking out of the breakfast cup for my coffee, the teacup is just a little bit too small.

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    2. The recipe is in Marguerite Patten We'll Eat Again page 59 , It's really good. I grated the carrot on the fine side of the grater and it just disappeared when cooked.

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    3. Thanks Tam I have that book, so I'll go and check it out. :-)

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  7. Yes, two completely different people, I have most of Ruth Goodmans DVDs, Wartime Farm, Victorian Farm etc etc
    .
    Parsley tart must be a really healthy dish and quite cheap to make ... although using milk, cream and cheese in it would make it hard to stretch to on rations. Maybe thick pastry and minimal filling ;-)

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  8. Thanks for sharing the curry recipe-DH will eat it too with some chicken added to his! Since I stopped using a teapot, we always drink from mugs but I may just get the teapot out again and use my lovely silver trimmed cups and saucers. Catriona

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    1. The beauty of virtually all the wartime vegetable recipes, and I guess modern ones too, is that you can just add meat to them if you eat it and have it available.

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  9. I used to love watching Victorian Kitchen Garden with Harry and Ruth. Funnily enough I made a veg curry for the first time in ages the other day. I was fortunate not to be on rations, mine included coconut oil and coconut cream, don't think that would have been available in wartime Britain!
    I'm finding these articles fascinating, thank you.
    Alison in Wales x

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    1. Now that's most likely the biggest diffference in the curry flavour, I hadn't thought of that. I usually add a little something creamy to it to mellow the flavours. I'll perhaps add a dash of milk next time I make a curry and see if that changes anything.

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  10. I too looked up Dukes pudding, it looks rather good but not for me sadly, too many carbs, I made rock cakes for our Macmillan coffee morning and I didn't touch a crumb :( but it's working ,3 weeks is and one pound away from one stone so hopefully my sugar levels are coming down, I leave the table when him indoors is eating his pudding or I might push his head into his custard, not that I'm a bitter woman :)

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    1. You're doing really well, you seem to have a lot of willpower ... as long as you leave the table. You really can't have your hubby wearing his custard.

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  11. I love those videos. I'm thinking most people were like Harry and Ruth and did what they had too without complaining. Have you watched war time farm and tales from the green valley? Both were wonderful also.

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    1. I haven't watched them recently, but I should, and I have them on DVD. They are both really good and will help to help keep me focused. I'll finish off with Harry and Ruth first though.

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